Workshop Guidelines

  1. Read each other’s essays, making minimal notes in the margins.
  2. Describe your essay’s motive to your group; ask the group if they can identify where you articulate motive and which of Walk’s “motivating moves” are involved.
  3. As a group, discuss the sentences in each of your essays where you describe the intertextual relationship between your two texts. Do you categorize it? What language do you use to describe it? Have you explained the relationship accurately? Interestingly? In precise terms?
  4. What does this intertextual relationship reveal about definitions or representations of the human? (The answer should be your thesis–more or less.)
  5. Discuss Harvey’s elements: Which are you using most effectively? Which need work?

Wild Card: At this stage in the process, you may decide to make changes to the essay’s structure–for example, move a paragraph, combine two paragraphs, or assign one of your paragraphs a different role or job. Just be sure to let me know what changes you’ve made in a cover letter you submit with your revised essay. 

Finally, talk through your plans for revision in concrete terms. Make a list of steps you will take to make your essay as strong as it can  be.

Writing Prizes

2018 QUEENS COLLEGE UNDERGRAD WRITING PRIZES

Guidelines for Submission

All currently matriculated QC undergrads, as well as those undergrads who finished in December 2017 but are graduating in June 2018, are eligible for prizes awarded in Fiction, Non-fiction, Drama, Poetry; and in work in any genre done in Composition courses, English 95 and 110. Students may submit work in any or all categories; work done as a class assignment is eligible. The Composition Prizes are limited to students whose work for English 95 and 110 was done in either Fall 2017 or Spring 2018. Page limits: for Non-fiction and Fiction, 20 pages; for Poetry, 10 pages; for Drama, two one-act plays or one full-length play. All work entries must be formatted according to MLA guidelines for English papers; students unsure of these guidelines may consult the Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL) at the following address:

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/

ENTRIES NOT FORMATTED IN MLA STYLE WILL NOT BE READ.

Submissions are due via email (qcwritingprizes@gmail.com) by 11:59 p.m. of Thursday, April 12.

Follow this procedure when submitting work:

Students may submit work in any or all categories. Students will submit all work via email to qcwritingprizes@gmail.com. Your email should be addressed to the Writing Prizes Committee. Indicate your name and your class standing in the body of your email. Please indicate for what prize you are submitting in the subject line of your email. For example, if you are submitting poetry, fiction, drama, or general non-fiction, please indicate so in the subject line of your email. If you are submitting work for a specific non-fiction prize (The David B. Feinberg Prize, The Clinton Oliver Prize, etc.) please indicate so in the subject line of your email.

Your emailed submission should include two attachments: a cover sheet and the work you are submitting. Please format your attachments as either Word documents (.doc or .docx) or pdfs. Google docs will not be accepted. Save your cover sheet document as the following: Full Name dot Genre of Submission (Example: JaneDoe.Poetry.doc). Save your work document as the following: Pseudonym dot Genre of Submission (Example: W’Kabi.Fiction.doc). Each submission should be a separate email. Therefore, if you are submitting in three genres, you will send three separate emails. The cover sheet should include the following information:

Pseudonym, Real Name and Student ID#

Genre of your submission, Specific non-fiction category (if necessary)

Address, Phone Number, Email Address

The work submitted should include a pseudonym in place of the student’s real name.

Here is a list of specified non-fiction prizes; all prizes carry monetary awards in the range of $50 to $500, but the amounts vary from year to year:

COMPOSITION PRIZE FOR WORK DONE IN ENGLISH 95

COMPOSITION PRIZE FOR WORK DONE IN ENGLISH 110

CLINTON OLIVER PRIZE FOR WORK IN BLACK AMERICAN STUDIES

THE JAMES E. TOBIN PRIZE FOR AN ESSAY ON POETRY

LEO STATSKY PRIZE FOR AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL WORK ON ENCOUNTERS WITH AMERICAN LIFE

THE CATHY DAVIDSON PRIZE FOR SCHOLARSHIP ON AMERICAN LITERATURE PRE-1865

THE KAY KIER MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR AN ESSAY ON LATE 19TH CENTURY (POST-1865) OR 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE

THE FACULTY PRIZE FOR AN ESSAY ON MEDIEVAL OR EARLY MODERN LITERATURE

THE FACULTY PRIZE FOR AN ESSAY ON SCIENCE FICTION, FANTASY, OR CHILDREN’S LITERATURE

THE FACULTY PRIZE FOR AN ESSAY ON THE GRAPHIC NOVEL

THE EDMUND L. EPSTEIN MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR AN ESSAY ON TWENTIETH CENTURY BRITISH OR IRISH LITERATURE

DAVID B. FEINBERG PRIZE FOR AN ESSAY ON GENDER AND SEXUALITY

MAUREEN WATERS PRIZE FOR AN ESSAY ON IRISH STUDIES

QC ALUMNI PRIZE FOR AN ESSAY ON ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES

QC ALUMNI PRIZE FOR AN ESSAY ON LATINO/LATINA STUDIES

*Faculty may also nominate noteworthy work for specific prizes.

Prize winners will be contacted by Friday, April 27th. The Writing Prizes Ceremony will take place on Wednesday, May 2nd. Exact time and location to be announced. Any questions, please contact Ryan Black at ryan.black@qc.cuny.edu.

Writing Rhetorics

Hi everybody. I’m writing to share an excellent blog on writing, by Ann-Marie Womack (Tulane University). It’s called Writing Rhetorics, and it’s excellent.

I recommend poking around the site and looking for topics that deal with aspects of writing you want to work on. I will likely ask you to use parts of the blog as you’re developing and workshopping your essay projects.

Harvey’s Elements for Tuesday

For Tuesday, each of you is assigned one of Harvey’s “Elements of the Academic Essay.” Your job is to find the element at work in one of our critical readings and explain your example to the rest of us during class.

Thesis–Nick A

Motive–Minire

Evidence–Maggie, Amara

Analysis–Andrew, Lisa

Keyterms–Victor, Tabi

Structure–Jordan, Nick G.

Stitching–Salia, Allison

Sources–Sabrina, Caitlin

Reflecting–Kaitlin, Kim

Orienting–Shaneeza, Ayesha

Stance–Christian, Mikki

Style–Emily

Title–Muneeza

Writing Activity: March 22 & March 27

Pretend you are Jill Lepore, author of “The Strange and Twisted Life of Frankenstein.” Your editor has asked you to add a paragraph about the connection to Get Out to your article.  Choose the place in the article it makes the most sense to insert the paragraph and write it with these guidelines in mind:

  1. Use at least one but not more than two critical sources.
  2. Think carefully about verbs and stances (see my handout).
  3. Describe the intertextual relationship between Frankenstein and Get Out using specific language. What type of intertextuality is this? I suggest looking at the Charles Bazerman article on intertextuality on our Supplemental Readings page. It will help you find language to describe specific relationships between texts–probably the most difficult part of this assignment.
  4. Be sure to include transitions that make the paragraph fit within the article as a whole.

For Tomorrow’s Class

Hi everybody. For tomorrow’s class–assuming the blizzard allows it–please do the following to prepare:

  1. Take another look at Gordon Harvey’s definitions of thesis and motive on his “Elements of the Academic Essay” handout.
  2. Underline or highlight thesis and motive moments in the short readings we’ll be discussing.
  3. Use Kerry Walk’s “motivating moves” handouts to identify the kinds of motive at play in each of these readings. Use her number system and just jot the numbers in the margins near the motive moments you identify.
  4. When you read Lepore’s Frankenstein article, do a little thinking about where in the article you might suggest adding a paragraph about Get Out if you were her editor.

Groups for March 15

  • Identify a scene or passage in Frankenstein that raises questions about the human explored by the text I’ve assigned your group.
  • Reflect on similarities and differences in the way the two texts handle these questions.
  • Choose a short passage from your assigned text that might help you interpret the novel.
  • Make a short list of other works that have an intertextual relationship with Shelley’s novel that involves some of the questions about the human raised in your assigned reading. If you were going to write about any of these texts, what would you do next?
Rousseau: Emily, Shaneeza, Minire, Amara, Mikki
Smith: Muneeza, Lisa, Victor, Christian, Kim
Wollstonecraft: Nick A, Tabi, Salia, Ayesha, Polly
Douglass: Maggie, Andrew, Jordan, Caitlin
Urban: Nick G., Allison, Sabrina, Vanessa, Kaitlin

Writing about Popular Music

Hi everybody. I’ll be teaching a course on writing about popular music next fall. If you’ve taken English 210W or 211W you’re eligible to enroll. You can talk to your advisor about it during pre-registration. Also, I encourage you to talk to an advisor during pre-registration!

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